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High cholesterol

My doctor said I have high cholesterol.
Does anyone know of a good daily menu to search for.
Thank you.
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Avatar universal
My mom has struggle with high cholesterol her entire life, here are a few advices that has worked for her, and I hope they can work for you:

Avoid fats, specially: eggs, shrimps and pork

Exercise, but mostly cardio, this will help burning that choleaterol away.

There are many tricks out there that says that will help you to low your cholesterol, believe me, my mom has tried THOUSANDS. Nevertheless there are two that really worked for her:

1. Eat açai and açai juice.
2. Flaxseed. Try to drink a glass with flaxseed and water every morning, or just add it to so e yogurt, milk, cereal or wathever. just always keep in mind that you gotta drink water after it.

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Avatar universal
All exercise is good for you and will improve your health.  As far as a fitness routine goes, a solid program that incorporates both cardiovascular exercise (the kind that gets your heart rate going) and strengthening exercises offers many benefits. If you're overweight and have high cholesterol, you can bring your weight down through good cardio exercise.

Try these exercise options to help shed pounds and manage high cholesterol:
Walking
Jogging or running
Swimming
Taking an aerobics class
Biking
Playing tennis, basketball, or other sports
Using weight machines or lifting free weights to build muscle tone


Exercise: Intensity, Duration, and Frequency

To truly lose weight and lower cholesterol, cardiovascular exercise is what's most important because it gets your heart rate up and burns the most calories. To get the most benefit out of exercise, be sure to:
Start out slowly. If you're overweight and out of shape, this is especially important when you begin your exercise program. You want to strengthen your heart, not overextend it.
Gradually increase the intensity and length of your workouts. To start a walking program, for instance, try going for a medium-paced walk, about 20 minutes long, about four days a week. Each week start pushing yourself a little more — walk a little longer and a little faster, and add an extra day. Eventually, you want to be walking for about an hour on almost every day of the week. You can challenge yourself more by doing some light jogging on your walk, or pushing yourself to walk up some big hills.
Remember that improving health and fitness with an exercise program should be a gradual change. It takes time for your body to be fit enough to keep up with strenuous exercise, and you're likely to be sore, burned out, and frustrated if you push yourself too fast. It's just too hard on your body to work at a level you’re not prepared for. So while it's great to be enthusiastic about losing weight, be smart and slow about it. Don't run five miles your first time out; build up to that pace. This approach will pay off with greater dividends in the long run.
Just get the OK from your doctor!
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Avatar universal
Mushrooms to Add to Your Diet

A few of my favorite health-enhancing mushroom species include:
Shiitake (Lentinula edodes): Shiitake is a popular culinary mushroom used in dishes around the world. It contains a number of health-stimulating agents, including lentinan, the polysaccharide for which it was named. Lentinan has been isolated and used to treat stomach and other cancers due to its antitumor properties, but has also been found to protect your liver,16 relieve other stomach ailments (hyperacidity, gallstones, ulcers), anemia, ascites, and pleural effusion.

One of the more remarkable scientific studies demonstrating shiitake's antitumor effect was a Japanese animal study,17 where mice suffering from sarcoma were given shiitake extract. Six of 10 mice had complete tumor regression, and with slightly higher concentrations, all ten mice showed complete tumor regression.

Shiitake mushrooms also demonstrate antiviral (including HIV, hepatitis, and the "common cold"), antibacterial, and antifungal effects; blood sugar stabilization; reduced platelet aggregation; and reduced atherosclerosis. Shiitake also contains eritadenine, which has strong cholesterol-lowering properties.
Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum): Reishi is known as Lingzhi in China, or "spirit plant." It's also been called "Mushroom of Immortality" — a nickname that kind of says it all. Reishi has been used medicinally in Asia for thousands of years. One of its more useful compounds is ganoderic acid (a triterpenoid), which is being used to treat lung cancer,20 leukemia and other cancers. The list of Reishi's health benefits includes the following
Antibacterial, antiviral (Herpes, Epstein-Barr), antifungal (including Candida) properties
Anti-inflammatory, useful for reducing symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
Immune system up-regulation
Normalization of blood cholesterol levels and blood pressure
Reduction of prostate-related urinary symptoms in men
Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor): Turkey Tail is also known as Coriolis, or "cloud mushroom." Two polysaccharide complexes in Turkey Tail are getting a great deal of scientific attention, PSK (or "Kreskin") and PSP, making it the most extensively researched of all medicinal mushrooms with large scale clinical trials.

A seven-year, $2 million NIH-funded clinical study in 2011 found that Turkey Tail mycelium improves immune function when dosed daily to women with stage I–III breast cancer. Immune response was dose-dependent, with no adverse effects. PSP has been shown to significantly enhance immune status in 70 to 97 percent of cancer patients. Turkey tail is also being used to treat many different infections, including aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, E. coli, HIV, Herpes, and streptococcus pneumonia, and is hepatoprotective. It may also be useful for chronic fatigue.
Himematsutake (Agaricus blazei): Himematsutake, also called Royal Sun Agaricus, is a relative of the common button mushroom. Himematsutake was not cultivated in the East until fairly recently but is now a very popular natural medicine, used by almost a half million Japanese.

Himematsutake mushroom is attracting many scientists worldwide due to its remarkable anticancer properties related to six special polysaccharides. Like many other medicinal mushrooms, this fungus can also protect you from the damaging effects of radiation and chemotherapy. But its benefits don't stop there — Himematsutake may also help decrease insulin resistance in diabetics, normalize your cholesterol, improve your hair and skin, and even treat polio.
Usage and Dosage Recommendations for Mushroom Supplements

When it comes to mushroom supplements, there are two primary types:
Mushroom concentrates or extracts — Most of these are so-called hot water extracts, where either the mushroom mycelia — the fruit body — is boiled for extended periods of time to extract the long chain polysaccharides. The end product is a concentrated form of glyconutrients (complex sugars) thought to be responsible for many of the health benefits of the mushroom.
Whole food/raw mushrooms — Consuming the mushrooms raw or using a whole food mushroom (powdered pill) product is generally a better alternative if you're reasonably healthy and looking to maintain optimal health, as they help maintain ideal function of your various systems as opposed to imparting a direct effect. Most of the knowledge about mushrooms come from ancient Chinese medicine where mushrooms are regarded as tonics. Tonics are considered to have non-specific beneficial effects across several systems of your body that do not decline over time.

As mentioned earlier, if you choose to eat your mushrooms raw, make sure they are organically grown, as their flesh easily absorbs air and soil contaminants. Likewise, you'll want to make sure any product you buy is certified organic for the same reason. In addition to valuable nutrients, whole mushrooms also provide healthful dietary fiber that acts as prebiotic platforms for the growth of probiotic organisms in your gut, which is very important for digestive health. This is yet another reason to opt for a whole food mushroom product.
Adding Mushrooms Is a Simple Way to Boost Your Health Through Your Diet

With all the evidence supporting mushrooms as little powerhouses of potent nutrition, I highly recommend adding some to your diet. They’re an excellent addition to any salad and go great with all kinds of meat and fish. “Let food be thy medicine” is good advice indeed, and with mushrooms that is especially true, as they contain some of the most powerful natural medicines on the planet.

Just make sure they’re organically grown in order to avoid harmful contaminants that mushrooms absorb and concentrate from soil, air and water. Also, avoid picking mushrooms in the wild

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Avatar universal
Cholesterol and Triglyceride Lowering Foods

Dark Chocolate
When it comes to chocolate, bitter is better – at least in terms of health. The benefits of chocolate come from flavonols and antioxidants (the same disease-fighting chemicals found in cranberries, apples, strawberries, and red wine). The caveat: Only real cacao contains flavonols, so look for chocolate that boasts a high percentage of cacao (60 percent or more). Dark chocolate also has fewer calories than other varieties, and when eaten in moderation, it lowers unhealthy LDL cholesterol and prevents plaque from building up in your arteries.

Pomegranates
Pomegranates have up to three times the antioxidants of red wine and green tea – and the juice has been shown to reduce artery-clogging plaque, which in turn prevents heart disease and stroke. Research shows that long-term consumption of pomegranate juice may also help slow aging and protect against cancer.

Eggs
The best protein source on the planet, eggs consistently outrank milk, beef, whey, and soy in the quality of protein they provide. In addition to containing all nine essential amino acids, eggs are loaded with nutrients. "And for God's sake, eat the yolks," says Bowden. People avoid the yolks because they fear cholesterol, but egg yolks contain choline, which helps protect heart and brain function and prevents cholesterol and fat from accumulating in the liver.
Almonds
Almonds are loaded with fiber and monounsaturated fat, both of which have been shown to lower cholesterol. According to the Food and Drug Administration, eating 1.5 ounces of most nuts, including almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. And even though almonds are relatively high in fat and calories, studies show that eating almonds can actually help with weight loss (their protein, fiber, and monounsaturated fats provide the feeling of fullness, preventing overeating).

Garlic
Research shows that garlic lowers total cholesterol and triglyceride (blood fat) levels, helping prevent clogged arteries. "Two to three cloves a day cut the odds of subsequent heart attacks in half for heart disease patients," says Bauman. "Garlic also tops the National Cancer Institute's list of potential cancer-preventive foods." Whole baked garlic helps detoxify the body of heavy metals like mercury (from fish) and cadmium. Garlic also acts as an antibacterial and antiviral, boosting resistance to stress-induced colds and infections. Can't stand garlic breath? Chew on a sprig of parsley.

Fish and Fish Oil
Eating fish helps cut the risk of heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's, stroke, diabetes, and arthritis. The fatty varieties may also help alleviate depression. The American Heart Association recommends that adults eat at least two fish meals per week, especially wild salmon, herring, and sardines, because those varieties provide the most heart-healthy omega 3s. Avoid mercury-containing varieties like shark, swordfish, king mackerel, tilefish, and albacore tuna, says Roberta Anding, M.S., R.D., national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. (Chunk light tuna is okay.)

Blueberries
Antiaging superstars, blueberries are loaded with antioxidants, especially anthocyanins, which have been shown to improve vision and brain function. Studies show that eating blueberries slows impairments in motor coordination and memory that accompany aging. These little berries also reduce inflammation, which is inextricably linked with virtually every chronic disease from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, to diabetes and heart disease. Other studies show that blueberries have much greater anticancer activity than other fruits.

Apples
"An apple a day really does keep the doctor away," says Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., C.N.S., author of The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth. Apples are loaded with the powerful antioxidants quercetin and catechin, which protect cells from damage - that means a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, especially if you eat the skin. Research shows that the apple peel contains five times more polyphenols than the flesh. Apples and their skins pack a lot of fiber too (about twice that of other common fruits, including peaches, grapes, and grapefruit), which may help fight the battle of the bulge.

Avocados
Sure, they're high in fat, but avocados contain healthful monounsaturated fat, which has been linked to a reduced risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. "Avocados aid in blood and tissue regeneration, stabilize blood sugar, and are excellent for heart disorders," says Ed Bauman, Ph.D., director of Bauman College. They're loaded with fiber (11 to 17 grams per fruit) and are a good source of lutein, an antioxidant linked to eye and skin health.

anadian researchers examined 26 U.S. and Canadian studies that included a total of more than 1,000 people. Their analysis showed that one daily serving (3/4 cup) of legumes -- foods such as beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas -- was linked to a reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by 5 percent. The study couldn't confirm cause-and-effect, but did show a strong association.

The 5 percent reduction in LDL cholesterol suggests a potential 5 percent lower risk of heart disease, according to a team led by Dr. John Sievenpiper, of the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.

The heart-healthy effect of legumes was greater in men than women, the research found. That may be because men tend to have worse eating habits and higher cholesterol levels to begin with than women, so they might gain more from switching to a healthier diet.

Some of the study participants reported stomach problems such as bloating, flatulence, constipation or diarrhea as a result of eating legumes.

Nevertheless, nutrition experts were quick to sing the praises of the lowly bean, pea and lentil.

"It's time to spill the beans. By making a small dietary change, such as consuming one serving a day of beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas -- as most of the world does already -- we can make a modest risk reduction in our incidence of heart disease by lowering our 'bad cholesterol' LDL, especially in men," said Dr. Robert Graham, an internist and natural remedy specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

He said the study analysis was "methodologically strong," with people being followed for at least three weeks to test the effect of legume intake on health. According to Graham, that three-week threshold is the same the U.S. Food and Drug Administration uses when it evaluates any product that claims to help lower cholesterol.

Dana Angelo White is a sports dietitian and assistant clinical professor at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn. She called legumes "one of the most underappreciated sources of protein out there. They are loaded with hunger-fighting fiber and protein, so I am not surprised to see the results of this study."

But White added that, "the tricky part is getting Americans to eat more. I suggest foods like hummus, lentil soup in the slow cooker, and adding beans to pasta dishes, soups, salads and quesadillas to work more into the daily diet."

The study was published April 7 in CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

L. reuteri may play a significant role in lowering cholesterol
I suggest the brand Nature's Way Primadophilus® Reuteri  Capsules

http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1112726760/cholesterol-probiotic-microbiome-ldl-lactobacillus-reuteri-110612/

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