Aa
A
A
A
Close
Heart Rhythm Community
12.1k Members
Avatar universal

Post Cryoablation Recovery

Hi guys :)

5 weeks ago I had cryoablation in order to fix my AVNRT problem which honestly wasn't that bad. I would get episodes 2-3 times a year (160-200 bpm) for which I had to go the emergency to get my amiodarone intravenously. The episodes would usually stop after a couple of hours (in some cases they would stop pretty quickly on their own, so a trip to the emergency room was not needed). I take 3x propafenon for th.

Unfortunately my cryoablation surgery wasn't a success as we decided to stop ablating my heart after many tries (once even using RF catheter). Doctors were always able to induce tachycardia every time after they thought they fixed the problem, but eventually the risks of damaging the AV node became too high so we stopped. However, one of the doctors said that the procedure maybe wasn't a complete failure as they have made my tachycardia weaker.

10 days after surgery I woke up to SVT after lying on my side. The feeling was quite different from all previous episodes I had. This time the episode was slow (130 bpm) and it came with sort of a itching sensation in the place where they  performed ablation (the same place where I feel those extra beats and tach). Went to ER, got propafenone intravenously and I converted almost immediately (prior to ab I would wait for hours for SVT to stop). 10 days after that, the same thing, woke up to an episode after lying on my side. The same thing, slowish tach, converted really quickly after intravenous propafenone. After that episode I began taking higher doses of rytmonorm (rhytmol) for therapy. It's been almost 3 weeks since the last episode, but every now and then i feel some skipped beats, flutters, short SVT runs and itching sensation in my chest. Granted, they do seem pretty weak. But the sensation of irritation remains... my heart just seems more sensitive now. My surgery lasted around 5 hours...

I keep comforting and telling myself that this is all part of recovery period. I have read a lot of posts here saying that even people who were cured from SVT had episodes for months after the surgery so I guess it's only logical for me to have them as well, especially how my ablation wasn't even successful. I just hope that I'll get back to my normal routine in time. What do you guys think about this? Thanks in advance and  best of luck to you all.  
3 Responses
12492606 tn?1459877633
AVNRT ablation has pretty high success rates here in the states - high 90's percent using RF.  Cryo is lower.  Both are high enough to be first line therapy here in the states.  You had your ablation done in Croatia?  If so, what is the experience level and procedural volume over there?
Avatar universal
Zagreb (capital of Croatia) has great hospitals and experts, one of the best in Europe actually. Success of my ablation (or lack there of) had nothing to do with the level of competence of the people who had done the surgery. The thing is that I've also had open heart surgery 15 years ago which made it very difficult for them to accurately locate my AV node. That's why they did cryo instead of RF (although they did zap me once).
12492606 tn?1459877633
That completely explains why they had difficulty in mapping the AVNRT.  You will have to find a center that has specialist experienced in cogenital heart ablations.  They will need to have the stereotaxis system to navigate the catheter safely.  I am surprised to hear that they tried cryo on you given your prior surgery.  I guess they must think that it was worth a try.
Have an Answer?
Top Arrhythmias Answerers
1807132 tn?1318747197
Chicago, IL
1423357 tn?1511089042
Central, MA
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Are there grounds to recommend coffee consumption? Recent studies perk interest.
Salt in food can hurt your heart.
Get answers to your top questions about this common — but scary — symptom
How to know when chest pain may be a sign of something else
A list of national and international resources and hotlines to help connect you to needed health and medical services.
Here’s how your baby’s growing in your body each week.