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1317327 tn?1316501042

4th Week Viral Load Results?

I went for a 4th Week check up to my GI, the Doctor said my VL was down from 3 million to 600 thousand... I don't know if that was good or not it being only  my 6th week on the Peginterferon Alpha 180 mcg 1x weekly and Ribavirin 600 mg x2 daily.  I don't know my geno type but I can tell you I have stage 3 liver damage.  The doc made me worried because she said that if by week 12 if the VL isn't down to 0 they will stop the treatment.... But I am hopeful because it was @ 3,000,000 and now to 600,000.... anythoughts?
10 Responses
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648439 tn?1225058862
Hiya - I know there are some people here who know the mathematics for this and can tell you what they are. You need to go down to zero by week 12 for the treatment to be considered a good enough chance for a cure and therefore continued. Ask your doctor what your drop means in terms of the 2 log drop needed. Your doctor is quoting standard practice.
Helpful - 0
648439 tn?1225058862
At week 4 you want to see at least a 1-log decrease, which means reducing your viral load by 90% (NINETY percent).

90% of 3,000,000 = 270,000 at Week 4. This is what you would want to see for the best chance of a cure.  If your viral load continues to decrease at this rate you will be UND (undetected virus)  at Week 12. Not having UND at 4 weeks means you are not a rapid responder but not necessarily a slow responder either. The speed of your response to the treatment is an indicator of treatment success but not the sole indicator - just one of many variables. 1b has a slightly better response to your particular treatment than 1a but not a key difference.

Other people will know more.
Helpful - 0
1225178 tn?1318980604
I'm not sure about the math either, but I'll answer so that your post will get moved up so the really smart ones will see it. We've got people on here who have been studying hep c for YEARS.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
A 2 log drop from 3,000,000 IU/ml would be 30,000 IU/ml.

The 12 weeks PCR should show either undetectable or be a 2 log drop from your starting viral load. Otherwise the odds of success are not good enough to continue with standard treatment. Some studies show that slow responders who extend treatment increase their odds of achieving SVR - primarily be reducing relapse.

I think you have a good chance to achieve the 2 log drop by week 12 - I certainly hope you will.

Good luck,
Mike
Helpful - 0
179856 tn?1333547362
As usual, Michael is exactly correct.  I am one of the people who extended treatment because I had a two log drop but stilll had a few virons left at week 12.  I extended to 72 and have been cured for over 3 years. You still have six weeks so get going and kill those suckers!!!!!!!

Helpful - 0
1317327 tn?1316501042
Unfortunately since my last post, I was not responsive to the treatment.  I do however start a new aggressive treatment this weds.  Prayers are appreciated.  God bless!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Sorry treatment didn't work last time. good to hear you are trying again. hopefully with one of the new drugs that came out earlier this year.
best of luck

Helpful - 0
1317327 tn?1316501042
Yes, it's a combination therapy of Interferon, Ribavirin and a New drug... I am nervous but I want to beat this!1
Helpful - 0
223152 tn?1346978371
It is always kind of nice when an old thread has a conclusion.

I am sorry you didn't clear first time but it is looking like there are a lot of successes with the new PI's.

Good luck
frijole
Helpful - 0
1317327 tn?1316501042
I actually forgot that I joined the community, it's great to have support!
Helpful - 0
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