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Multiple Sclerosis Community
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Avatar universal

New here with symptoms

Hello- i am awaiting lab work with my primary doc and possible a referral to a neurologist. I am 38 yr-old female experiencing extreme bouts of fatigue, periodic pins and needles in my legs and a strong burning sensation in my left thigh that comes and goes. I also have periodic itching all over my body in the evening, some urinary control issues and i am very prone to heat intolerance. Mainly, i am most bothered by the fatigue. I would appreciate any advice and or input on my symptoms, and what I should be asking my doctor?

Thanks!
5 Responses
Avatar universal
Update: doc has ordered an MRI. She is somewhat concerned because she checked my reflexes and thought they were hyper-sensitive...anyone else has experience with this?
667078 tn?1316000935
   Has your GP done a neurological exam? If that is abnormal she can refer you to a neurologist. If the doctor thinks it could be MS you need a MS Specialist. All neurologists do not know about MS. They specialize.
   As far as fatigue. Mild exercise can help. I do more than mild exercise and it really helps me. Otherwise you have to manage your energy like money in the bank. Once it is gone in a day it is gone. Many of us do too much and pay for it the next day. You do the most strenuous stuff early in the day if possible. Most of us work and have to devote energy for work. Most MSers have to ask for help if possible. Like with the house work. Heat makes it worse. You can get a prescription like adderall or ritalin to help.
Avatar universal
Thanks... and no she has not done a neurological exam I think she wants to do the MRI first. Maybe I should request neuro exam before MRI?

Also, on a side note is the fatigue something that usually only happens during a relapse... Or is it something that always stays with those who have MS? I just hope to get some answers and Rule things out... As I worry I am afraid that I am making things worse in my mind! But the main thing that is bothering me now is just overall weakness fatigue and the odd burning sensation in my left leg is very odd and worrisome.
987762 tn?1331027953
COMMUNITY LEADER
Hi and welcome,

The first thing i'd highly recommend is to stay open minded and not get too overly focused on it being MS....the symptoms you've mentioned are not particularly suggestive of a neurological condition like MS, and because MS affects the central nervous system and there are many medical conditions that can also cause same or similar symptoms, at this stage it genuinely may have nothing to do with neurological conditions like MS...keep breathing!

If your GP checked your reflexes she has at least done a mini neuro exam, hyper sensitive reflexes could be a sign of Hyperreflexia but it's not diagnostic of anything in particular though.....reflexes that are hyper all over, symmetrical, bilateral upper and or lower limbs etc wouldn't be suggestive of a neurological condition like MS because of the way MS lesion's basically work, still could be spinal related but lessens the potential of it being MS caused.  

Keep in mind that wide spread hyper reflexes can even be within normal ranges, anxiety related, medication caused (eg central nervous system delivered SSRI's) etc but if your reflexes were unilateral (one side of the body) it definitely limits causation and MS would be one potential explanation...

Q:is the fatigue something that usually only happens during a relapse... Or is it something that always stays with those who have MS?

A: The answer is basically yes and no or no and yes, it honestly depends....Fatigue is a gray area in general, not only has the term become overly used by everybody now a days, fatigue can be caused by many different medical issues, anything from sleep deprivation to the serious medical conditions and there are even different types of fatigue eg all over general, isolated muscle(s), lassitude etc

In MS, fatigue is one of the most common issues with stats around 80% and associated with psuedo's, relapses and everyday.....Lassitude fatigue is more unique to MS, it's the type of fatigue that is unmistakable despite the desire or situation ie if the house was burning an MS experiencing lassitude would struggle to find the energy to save them selves

""MS fatigue" that make it different from fatigue experienced by persons without MS.

*Generally occurs on a daily basis
*May occur early in the morning, even after a restful night’s sleep
*Tends to worsen as the day progresses
*Tends to be aggravated by heat and humidity
*Comes on easily and suddenly
*Is generally more severe than normal fatigue
*Is more likely to interfere with daily responsibilities

MS-related fatigue does not appear to be directly correlated with either depression or the degree of physical impairment."

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/Symptoms-Diagnosis/MS-Symptoms/Fatigue
  
Hope that helps.......JJ  



  
18829064 tn?1468512593
Hi Slandia
Sound like ms. Not all are affected by humidity,,, like me.  Literally drain off strength and I will vomit easy"
-have have urinary issues.
-in the begining my eyes bothered me, 26 yrs later blurry ness in one eye.
-Fatigue daily "NAP alot or rest body.
Get referred to a neurologist...oventually"sp? we all think they are ********

"love talking to someone  who me" KEEP WRITING me

SANDRA
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