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Has anyone experienced twitching with Hypothyroidism?

About 9 months ago I started feeling pain in my hand that was unexplainable. Shortly after my symptoms exploded. I had lots of blood work, a CT scan, an MRI. After tons of testing the only thing that turned up was a change in my thyroid levels and elevated thyroid antibodies. I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. My symptoms gradually leveled off and were almost gone. A few months ago I got very stressed and felt a return and worsening in my symptoms and even since I’ve been having twitching in my legs. The endocronologist I saw was awful, didn’t adjust my meds, I’m on 25 mcg of levothyroxin, even though my levels are in the mid- low ranges. She didn’t answer questions I had and blew off my symptoms as “something else”.
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Avatar universal
There is much to discuss, but  first please post your thyroid related test results and reference ranges.  Also, if tested for Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin, please post those as well.  Even more important than blood tests, are symptoms.  Please tell us all the symptoms you have.  
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1756321 tn?1547095325
Stress (both physical and mental) cause a lot of issues. I personally had depleted stomach acid (chronic stress), magnesium loss (my cause of twitching),  immune issues (Graves antibodies show up),  adrenal fatigue, needing an increase in my B12 spray. I love ASMR videos on YouTube. SO relaxing and tingly~!
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Avatar universal
I have experienced muscle twitching, but I doubt my hypothyroidism caused the twitching (usually I experience it after endurance activities, or weight lifting).

According to "the internet", causes for muscle twitching include:
Excessive exercising
Dehydration
Deficiency in calcium and magnesium
Side effects of medications (including corticosteroids, diuretics, etc.)
Overdose of medication

Stress itself, including emotional and mental stress, can cause muscle twitching too.

My first instinct when hearing about your twitching is that it could be from stress, but a quick internet search also brings up a link between pain and cramping in hands and feet, muscle cramps, pain, and muscle twitching with hypoparathyroidism.  The parathyroid glands are four small glands located on the back of your thyroid, and they produce parathyroid hormone (PTH) which regulates calcium levels in the blood.  Too little PTH causes blood calcium levels to drop and phosphorous to rise.  (I had low PTH for about two months after my thyroid surgery.  It's finally back to a normal level now).  

I do not know if Hashimoto's can cause or influence hypoparathyroidism since I've only experienced a little following my surgery (I also have Hashi's), but I would suggest trying to get your endocrinologist to test your calcium, magnesium, and PTH, but at the very least test your calcium levels, because that could be causing the twitching.

I hope you feel better soon and can figure out what is going on.
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Avatar universal
Thank you! I had a follow up with my GP but didn’t get an answer about the twitching. He did say my TSH was elevated and agreed to up my dose to 50 mg.  He tested my magnesium level and it was normal but he didn’t test my calcium level. I’m feeling better since upping the dosage of meds but the twitching isn’t gone. It’s been two weeks today since I increased meds, should I feel the full effects by now? The latest numbers I have are TSH 3.870, T3 FREE 2.5, T3 1.11, T4 FREE .94. I’m new to all this and I don’t know what any of that means. I’m just worried about the twitching. I’m hoping it’s hashi related and not something worse. Thank you!
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Avatar universal
I had muscle spasms all over my body
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