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Hashimoto's and Frequency of checking levels?

Was just (officially) diagnosed last Friday with Hashimoto's Disease.
TSH was fine, but fT4 and fT3 were less than optimal and I had TPO ab present, and I have just started treatment.
My levels aren't crazy bad by any means, however I was definitely very symptomatic of hypo.

I was just wondering how often one should go and have all of their levels and antibodies checked?

I am at present taking selenium as well as on a super restrictive diet (as part of a SIBO treatment regimen) and after that is completed I plan on switching over to a diet with the intentions to help lower TPO ab more so (or at least, hopefully stop triggering them to produce more!)

Also how long does it take to see changes in TPO ab levels?
3 Responses
Avatar universal
need your symptom list, your actual blood lab results including reference ranges and also the medication and the dosage that you have begun.

Diet has very little to marginal effect on antibody levels.

TPO antibodies being present means nothing unless  they are elevated.
1756321 tn?1547095325
I have my thyroid labs including antibodies tested a few times over the years. TPOAb went down in the range with selenium (from Brazil nuts). TPOAb increased drastically due to hyperthyroidism and a serious hit of toxic mould. TgAb has dropped to normal but currently above the range again.
1756321 tn?1547095325
I have more time to answer. :) At the beginning you may need to test numerous times until your hormone levels are stable.    It is up to you if you want to retest every year.  If I'm at the doctors for whatever reason I'll add my thyroid labs/antibodies to the list of tests.  I've noted state of oxidative stress raise my TPOAb.

Dr Cabot is a famous doctor here in Australia. She wrote a book called Your Thyroid Problems Solved and this book is how I first discovered selenium can lower TPOAb. This info is from her book (I edited the info) treating one of her patients. The result is a drastic reduction of TPOAb.
My TPOAb levels dropped 15% with selenium but that wasn't too bad since my diet was very poor and I had severe insulin resistance at the time.

Patient with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis:

The level of her T3 hormone is very low, whilst her T4 level is quite high; the high T4 is coming from her thyroxine medication. The body is not converting thyroxine (T4) into T3.

Free T3 = 1.1 pmol/L (2.5 - 6.0)
Free T4 = 23 pmol/L (8.0 - 22.0)
TSH = 2.0 mIU/L
Anti thyroglobulin antibodies = 80
Anti microsomal antibodies = 1200 (thyroid peroxidase antibodies)

New treatment: Patient prescribed T3 (brand name tertroxin) 20mcg three times a day, T4 100mcg a day, selenium (Dr Cabot recommends 200mcg daily), gluten and dairy free diet, bowel and liver detox.

Three months later:

Free T3 = 5.0 pmol/L (2.5 - 6.0)
Free T4 = 16 pmol/L (8.0 - 22.0)
TSH = 1.9mIU/L
Anti thyroglobulin antibodies = 40
Anti microsomal antibodies = 350

1 Comments
Wow! Perfect! Thank you for the information! I'm seeing an internist presently (and am looking to find a new pcp), he is the one that has diagnosed me  with Hashimoto's (as well as the nasty case of SIBO).  I'm sure he will want to check my levels until they seem to have stabilized as you've said. I can see how yearly checking could be extremely beneficial.

Thank you!
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1756321 tn?1547095325
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