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Avatar universal

Weird muscle vibrations and Low WBC

I'm normally a very healthy person with very few medical issues, but in the last 2 months it feels like my body has decided that my early 30s is a great time to break down.  Here's the history of what happened.  About a month ago I went to the ER with very intense chest pain. Doctor did a CT, bloodwork, ekg, and drew a blank, no clue what was causing it but thought it might be very bad acid reflux. He did say that my white blood cell count was very low (more on that latter). My GP prescribed Omeprazol and referred me to a Cardiologist just to be sure.  The Cardiologist stated that my symptoms were classic peritonitis and should resolve in a week or so, sure enough the pain was gone in a few days.  What stumped the cardiologist was just why I had peritonitis, as I hadn't been sick and she said usually a virus (like a cold) settles in to the chest and causes it.  She ordered an echo to make sure there was nothing else going on and there were no issues found.  She did say I have a very slight murmur, the first I've ever heard of this.

While at the ER my WBC showed very low neutrophile count. This had happened once before about 3 years ago, and resolved in a few weeks with us never able to figure out why. After running weekly WBC for the last month, with my neutrophile count rising but never hitting normal and then dropping again, my GP referred me to a Hematologist.  He's stumped as well, and has ordered another month of WBCs.  When this happened 3 years ago I was tested for Lupus, MS, Rhumatoid Arthritis, and Psoriatic Arthritis. This most recent time I was tested for Hep C. We've ruled all those out.

Now, in the last few days, a new issue.  I feel like my body is vibrating! It happens when I'm resting or trying to sleep.  The only way I can describe it is it's like I just worked out really hard and I have the post workout shakes, but I'm also shivering.  There is no physical shaking just that my muscle's feel like they are twitching. Sometimes I feel like my heart is racing or fluttering, but if I take my pulse it's normal. Sometimes its almost like I can hear my heart beat or even a whooshing. This is making it very hard to sleep at night.  I've had this feeling occasionally and briefly in the past, but usually goes away after a few minutes.  Now, it's not stopping!

As for specifics, I'm 32, female, non-smoker, drink a glass of wine on rare occasions, never used drugs.  The only meds I'm taking are the omeprazole and my birth control. Before this, my biggest issues were allergies and headaches, which i've gotten all my life, sometimes they are cluster, sometimes tension, sometimes they are full migraines. I do have panic attacks, but I realized a few days ago that I've gone nearly a month without having one and I've done things that normally trigger them. Honestly, I haven't had one since the ER trip, and for someone that was having one a week at least, that was remarkable.

I'm getting really frustrated with all this. I'm NEVER sick, which is amazing considering just how low my neutrophile count is. Between the low WBC, the fluttery/vibrating thing, I feel like they have to be connected and something has to be wrong. The fact the doctors are stumped is not helping.  Any ideas would be much appreciated!
2 Responses
1530171 tn?1448133193
Some anxiety, stress, panic attacks can tense the muscles around your stomach and cause acid reflux symptoms.
Having said this, it does not necessarily mean that you have excess* gastric acid. So, in the event your gastric levels are low or even normal, Omeprazole-a PPI class of drug- may not be the best choice, as it  results in a reduced ability to breakdown foods and to absorb nutrients/vitamins, when taken long term.
* Acid reflux symptoms are the same, whether low or high gastric levels.

You will probably benefit from transdermal magnesium oil treatment.
This is a preferred  method of magnesium supplementation, a natural
relaxant with many health benefits, since it is involved in over 300
bodily processes.

Your low WBC could be easily attributed to an underlying low grade infectious condition and perhaps a factor in your peritonitis.

I developed a couple years ago a bout of pleuritis, an inflammation of
the pleura, a membrane which covers the rib cage, lungs and the chest
cavity.
The suspicion was that an underlying viral infection was the cause,
however I had no symptoms other than the excruciating pain.
I self-treated with DMSO 30% solution (topical) MSM (oral)
and self-hypnosis. Thank goodness, it only lasted 2 days!

Another suggestion is to have your methylocobalamin
(neurological form of B12) checked, but the standard MMA test will not reveal this. You need a Homocysteine CSF test.
If this is too complicated, you can do a methylocobalamin trial, to see if some of your neurological symptoms improve.

I hope this helps, however, please note that my comments and suggestions are not intended as a replacement for medical advice.

Best wishes,
Niko


Avatar universal
Sounds like it could be a a rare autoimmune disease called CIDP, which is a neurological  autoimmune disease. often people who have this have a really hard time explaining their symptoms. As that some are sensory.  As well as tingling in the hands and feet. Just a thought. Did you have high proteins in you blood or urine. This is a condition that can end up leaving you paralyzed or close to it and many Drs don't even know about it.
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