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clustered microcalcifications in right breast.

I have clustered microcalcifications in my right breast.  My mother had a masectomy for the same diagnosis at the same age as me.  My cousin had breast cancer and died from it.  My family history for cancer reads like a horror story, that is how one doctor described it! Another doctor said, it's not if you get cancer it's when you get cancer.
I have fourteen sibling and thirteen have had cancer.  Myself and one sister have not been diagnosed with cancer.  Most family members have had a least two types of cancer, lung, thyroid, soft pallete, uterine, colon, pancreatic, skin, prostate, brain...the list goes on with neices and nephews and cousins.
Should I just have a masectomy and get this breast cancer issue out of the way.  I feel like I'm doomed if I let this situation with my breast get away from me.  Please help me, I am 65, good health, children, grandchildren and a loving husband. I want to live...at any cost.


This discussion is related to microcalcification cluster.
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587083 tn?1327120262
Hi,
You would more likely get a reply soon, if you ask your question in your own new post.
When you add your queries on a previous post,people will most likely overlook it,assuming you are just adding another comment to the original poster.
To start your own thread just click on the green rectangle "Post a question" on the top of the page.
P.S.Please see if you could add more information concerning your case.
Is it DCIS ? (ductal carcinoma in situ) or IDC ?( invasive ductal carcinoma)
Take care...
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
hi, I did a biopsy on my suspicious calcifications.    I was told that 85% of the time they are benign...well I'm in the 15%... Today, .I was told it's ductal carcinoma, stage 0...I really don't know what all this means...but...I know it's not good....I really don't know what to do....I would like to remove both breast... I'm don't want to do chemo....I really can't beleive this is happening to me.
Helpful - 0
587083 tn?1327120262
Hi.
Radiologists are able to identify typically benign breast calcifications depending on their form and pattern.If no suspicion is detected a biopsy is not required to prevent unnecessary procedures and to reduce patient anxiety.
The report on your mammogram states that your BIRADS score is 3.This means that the finding has a very high probability of being benign (90%).The finding is not expected to change over the follow-up interval, but the radiologist prefers to establish its stability over time.
I really wouldn't worry so much if I were you ,because what your radiologist has recommended is standard procedure.If the suspicion about these calcifications were more elevated,a biopsy would have certainly been ordered.
If you feel too anxious waiting six months for a follow up,you could certainly ask your doctor to have your next mammogram done earlier or have a biopsy..Also you could have your report and  films read by another radiologist for a second opinion.
Best wishes...
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi, I got a copy of my breast imaging report and my assessment for the rt breast was ACR BI-RADS Category 3 recommendation 6 month follow up. There appears to be a new cluster of microcalcification identified within the immediate subareolar zone of the right breast.The right breast stroma is moderately dense with scattered heterogeneity noted as well.

I found two female General Surgeons that only do breast surgery in my town..  One of the doctor's has had a bilateral mysectomy for cancer in one breast. The other Doctor did the surgery.  

Let me know if you think I should still wait six months.

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Avatar universal
Thank you so much for your help and your willingness to share your history of breast cancer.  Nothing helps as much as speaking with someone who has been there, done that and bought the t-shirt.
I am asking my doctor to forward the radiologist's diagnosis to a General Surgeon that examed my breasts in the past for cysts. I am sure he will call me in for a consultation and will follow up with all my mammagrams in the future. I trust his judgement and he is approachable.
As much as I like my family doctor she is new to me in the last year and I am not sure how much she relies on other's opinions.
I believe in the area of cancer it is better to over react then do nothing.  While I wait the six months, I will check out and line up the best team of doctor's in the area.
  This won't be done in a panic mode but in a deliberate, well thought out procedure.  If I never get cancer I won't be out anything. If it does happen, I will know whom I want on my team.
Thank you all and bless you Cheerpul, may you have continued good health.  You are a brave woman who has made lemonade out of lemons.
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Avatar universal
It does sound reassuring to know it's not an immediate concern.  They did say MICROcalcification clusters on the original mammogram. I looked at the second insurance bill and it did say imaging for lesion detection. Radiologist must have had some concern that it was a lesion.  My doctor says to not worry and wait six months for another mammogram.  I asked my doctor's nurse if I could get a second reading on the mammogram and she said, no, your insurance won't pay for it. I asked if they would recommend a good breast surgeon but the nurse said it wasn't necessary. I will wait six months and have another mammogram.
My rt breast is tender and achy from the mammograms. That should go away in a few days hopefully. Thanks again.
Helpful - 0
587083 tn?1327120262
Hi again,
Well, this is good news since the spot compression mammogram shows that the macrocalcification are probably benign and not in need of a biopsy at this time,but only to recheck in 6 months to see if there are any changes.
I am sure that if the calcifications were alarming a biopsy would have been recommended by the radiologist,no doubt about it.
But I think that you should talk to your doctor( face to face) for a complete explanation of your report.If you are still terribly worried and don't feel comfortable waiting 6 months,you could ask your doctor if the recheck could be done at an earlier date.
All the best to you! :)
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks everybody for your comments.  I appreciate everybody's thought's on how to handle this situation.

I went for the second set of mammagrams.  They were called compressed mammagrams.
My doctor's office called and said to have another mammagram in six months. I am not sure what is going on, I asked but they didn't really tell me anything other than I should  get another mammagram in six months to see if anything changed.  
Helpful - 0
1119363 tn?1330355440
I have only a couple of family members who have had cancer and had microcalcifications show up on my mammogram in 2009.  I had a BIRADS score of 5 (of 5.)  I had a surgical biopsy which found extensive high-grade DCIS, of the comedo type, a precancerous condition.  I opted to have a mastectomy.  After the mastectomy, the tissue was analyzed and a small (5mm) tumor was found that had never shown on a mammogram, spot compression or ultrasound.  It was Her2 positive, a gene which makes cancer likely to grow and spread aggressively.  So I took chemo, Herceptin,  and 6 weeks ago had a prophylactic mastectomy of the other breast, which had no disease.  Chemo was rough, but temporary.  The surgeries went very well for me with a minimum of discomfort.

I share this story because I am doing great.  I am 48, have a family, sing in several choirs, work and do theater.  I have a good local oncologist and fabulous surgeon, and a good oncology team at a large teaching hospital a couple hours away.  The important thing is to be able to live your life and do the things you want to do and be with the people you love.  Breasts, or the lack of, don't really matter.  Do what makes you feel the most comfortable and at peace with your decision.  If you need surgery, there are choices.  You can go with more or less, depending upon your condition and treatment options.  You can opt for reconstruction or not, if you do choose a mastectomy.  I have chosen to go with two mastectomies with scars that are simply pink lines; no reconstruction, no prosthetics and I'm an enjoying being free of a bra.  Nobody else can tell by looking, unless I tell them what's been done.

With your history, cancer will always be in the back of your mind.  That's prudent, but don't let it take over your life.  Get a team of good doctors and research the tests you have and the pathology reports you get, so that you can discuss them with your doctors and make decisions with them.  Has anyone in your family been tested for the BRACA gene or other genetic mutations that often are present in families with a strong history of cancer?  Being tested might give you some valuable insights.  I would suggest working closely with doctors and/or counselors to help you with the process and results.  

For now, have the cluster of microcalcifications thoroughly checked out.  If it is benign, wonderful news.  You know that you have been thoroughly checked and things are good.  If it turns out that there is more going on, you are catching it early with many options available to you.  And that is still pretty good news.  Don't let the "what-ifs" take over and make you miserable.
Helpful - 0
684030 tn?1415612323
I can well understand where you're coming from because my family history of Cancer (on both parent's side) is pretty scary too. And, I also had a radiologist "gently" inform me that it was a matter of "when" not "if" I get Cancer when my micro-calcifications first appeared at the age of 49. So, wherever any abnormality shows up in me... my "worse case scenario auto-pilot" kicks into over-drive.

But anyhow... your micro-cals will first need to be biopsied to determine their true nature before deciding on anything as drastic as a mastectomy. Of course, it's you're choice whatever you decide... but, I recommend waiting for further diagnostic testing... then, a biopsy... then, a comprehensive pathology report... and, finally an in-depth discussion with your doctor before even thinking about having a mastectomy.

But just so you know, micro-calcifications are rarely, if ever found to be cancerous. Yes, they're an abnormality that shouldn't be dismissed nor ignored... so, do have them checked out. If they turn out to be benign... and according to the statistics, that's highly likely, then maybe you won't need that mastectomy after all. And, if they turn out to be something more serious, then consider your options and weigh that information with your doctor's advice.

tc, "i"
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Avatar universal
There is an entire orchestra and a thousand voice's singing "Hallelujah" in my head right now!!
Thanks for the vote of confidence! I go tomorrow for a second mammagram.
Helpful - 0
587083 tn?1327120262
Hi there,
To have a mastectomy is a decision that only you and your doctor can make,depending of what the finding will be after a biopsy is done.I think that you are jumping to conclusions thinking that cancer is present.You are understandably alarmed because you have a strong family history of breast cancer,but keep in mind that the majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history at all.
Microcalcifications that grow in a cluster are of course suspicious because they sometimes cluster around a mass and may indicate that there is an abnormal growth in the area.The only way to determine if there is any cancer is to biopsy.If by a remote chance the pathology report says that cancer in present,then it would be at a very early stage and it's highly curable.Many biopsies done on clustered calcification return a benign finding though and I hope that your biopsy result will be favorable too.
Best wishes...  
Helpful - 0
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