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Depression/Mental Health Forum
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Avatar universal

Candidate for a Sex Change?

I do plan to talk t a therapist about this, but I wanted to get a first opinion so I could go in with a little bit of information.  

I am a 23 year old female, but all of my life I have related best to men, and have always been a "tomboy".  Even as a child playing pretend "role-playing" games (heros, cowboys, etc) when asked who I wanted to be, I always chose a male character or name.  I feel I am more pscycologically male than female, in mannerisms, interests, etc.  

Here's my question though:  I am heterosexual.  The very idea of being with another woman sexually is something that is repulsive to me.  If I don't have gender identity issues, what else could be the cause of these feelings?  Would I be a good candidate for a sex change, and if not, what else could I consider?

Thanks for your time.
1 Responses
Avatar universal
Erin,

    What you discribe is discomfort with your current gender identity.  There are various reasons as to why this may be the case and will require investigation via therapy to clarify and possibly indentify the situation.  Without this knowledge specific recommendations can not be made.  Candidates for sex change treatment require ongoing therapy and must live in the other gender role for 1-2 years often before surgery will be done.  Please follow through with a psychological evaluation.  You may also search the internet including this forums archives using gender identity disorder as a keyword.  I hope this was helpful.

Sincerely,

HFHS MD-JM
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