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RVSP on Echo

Hi, I was wondering if someone in the medical field could answer my question. I'm a 27 yr old female. I had an echo cardiogram because of heart palpitations (that turned out to be panic attacks and went away). The echo said the structure of my heart was normal, and my ejection fraction was 58%, but that my RVSP was 36mmhg with trivial mitral and tricuspid regurgitation. My doctor told me it was a normal echo, but I saw the number on my own and got concerned, as the Internet seems to think it's suggestive of pulmonary hypertension. I've had anxiety since childhood, and after going through records, noticed I also had an echo done when I was 17 yrs. old, 10 yrs ago, that had a similar RVSP of 37. I'm wondering if this is something I should pursue, or since the number is basically the same in 10 years, am I likely fine? Wouldn't PAH symptoms have shown up by now since I've apparently had that value for 10 years? I admit that I am also overweight...I was less so at 17, but still overweight...I am trying to lose it, but wonder if this would affect it, too. I was also likely nervous during both echos, and my heart rate bounces in the early 100s when I get anxious. I have severe health anxiety and worry about everything, so I would truly appreciate anyone who could help me.
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Avatar universal
Unless you have a medical degree, it's unwise and unhealthy to brood over numbers that your own doc pronounces healthy--especially if you don't have symptoms of, good heavens, pulmonary hypertension.  

The best thing would be the long-overdue treatment of the severe health anxiety you know you have.
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