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angiogram

Has anyone had an angiogram with the catheter inserted in arm or neck instead of the groin? I don't think I could take the groin without serious nerve spasms.
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Avatar universal
Yes, I do wonder why the docs don't just tell you what they can do to help you get through the procedure, rather than trying to scare you into doing something that you are already afraid of.  Doesn't make a whole lot of sense, does it?  Good luck.  Once you get this done, then at least you shouldn't have to do it again for a long, long time.
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Avatar universal
I can't thank you all enough.This a prime xampe of the value of these forums. I'm  much more  ready now for what I have to do. Your encouragment I absorb instatnly. Not so the pressures of the cardios who say that during five months of my dithering my heart walls could be deteriorating and the arteries  thickening. I find this hard to
take in while biking or run/walking my   daily  three/four-mile stint with no pain or breathlessness, but I'd better behave, in the end, and get on with it. Bless you all
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1209084 tn?1267367406
I apparently had a uniquely rotten experience with the catheter through the groin when I had my angioplasty, so I'm perhaps not the best person to ask about this.  But one thing - be prepared to have your groin area look like somebody took a Louisville Slugger to it about 25 times when you're done.  Even my 'naughty bits' were blackened and bruised. The bruising was incredible to see, but the color change back to normal over about a week and a half down there was like a Hawaiian sunset - beautifully awesome.
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Avatar universal
They give you intravenous Versed (look it up), which makes you not care about anything.  It is the best "high" that I have ever had.  Once that Versed starts running in your vein, if you still feel at all nervous, then tell the staff, because they can and will give you more.  They can put you all the way out, if you need them to.  I slept through most of both of my caths.  But during the part that I was awake for, I did not mind one bit what they did to me.  And lest you think I tolerate these kinds of "procedures" well anyway, let me tell you now, that I do not.  I have extreme anxiety.  But Versed is my best friend when I have to go through an invasive procedure.  You can also ask the doctor for an anti-anxiety medication to take by mouth on the morning of the procedure, if you need it.  They may tell you "nothing by mouth," but then they make exceptions for certain pills that you have to take -- and maybe that is one of the pills that you have to take.  Good luck.
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63984 tn?1385437939
I've been to the cath lab six or eight times, and they always tell me I'll feel a slight sting.  I've never felt anything other than pressure.  By far the most difficult part of it is not moving your leg afterwards for a few hours.  Proceed with great confidence.
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976897 tn?1379167602
The only thing you feel is a slight sting when the anaestheic goes in. You are covered over and laying flat so you can't see anything that's going on. Just close your eyes, or, look at the monitor above you. Its fasninating watching your own heart.

"As far as I know, they are second option when the femoral artery is not accessible due to any injury"

Or heavily diseased. I think I read that the arm can be difficult in many people due to curvature in the arteries.
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Avatar universal
thank you both. I've had needles under the eyelid, in the roof of the mouth without squirming. But the ideao f one in the femoral makes me curl up into fetal position. That would be a bright thing to do when the cardio is ready with his catheter. I've held off five months since being pressured to do it. I could live (or not) to regret it, I guess
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916737 tn?1243936842
I think that going through the femoral artery is the easiest and safest method, since the catheter will ascend directly through the Aorta, curve with it before entering the coronary branches.

The arm track is more difficult, and the carotid is more risky. As far as I know, they are second option when the femoral artery is not accessible due to any injury.
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976897 tn?1379167602
Some people confuse the term 'groin' to mean the actual genitals. Is this what you are thinking? The catheter goes into the inside of your leg, near the top, to enter the femoral artery. If this is offtrack I apologist. The area is numbed of course and you are given medication to keep you relaxed.
If I'm offtrack, some cardiologists can go through the wrist.
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