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Can Sinusitis cause hemoptysis?

In last few years I frequently, especially in winter, had cold and nasal congestions. During last few weeks I regularly had headache along with cold. Two weeks ago I got cough as well, but not more than twice a day lasting more than 1.5 minutes a day. However, the cough was absent in last two weeks, though I had regular headache and intermittent nasal congestions.


To my astonishment, two days ago suddenly I coughed fresh blood. I consulted a doctor and completed CBC, CXR PA Digital, PNS OM View, Creatinine and Serum IGE tests. Chest Skiagram is found normal; have got right maxillary sinusitis with bilateral HIT; White Blood Cells 12.8*10^9/L.

Doctor has prescribed:
1. Moxifloxacin 400mg -once a day
2. Tranexamic Acid 500mg- twice a day
3. Montelukast 10mg- once a day
4.Levosalbutamol 1.25 mg- twice a day
5. Fexofenadine Hydrochloride 120mg- once a day
6. Deflazacort 24mg- once a day.

I have started taking the above medicine for last three days. Now, I feel healthy save some little dizziness. However, I still suddenly cough fresh blood once or twice a day with almost zero phlegm. I feel the blood not coming from the lung, but from somewhere in the pharynx. When the coughing starts, some clotted blood comes first and then fresh blood. Each time I cough about two minutes and gradually the feel of coughing is over.

Now I am confused whether the hemoptysis is caused by the maxillary sinusitis or something else. Should I consult an ENT specialist or continue the current medication and wait for the desired cure?


Thanks in advance.
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