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Avatar universal

House fire! Smoke inhalation! HELP!

CONGRATS to all y'all moms-to-be!  I am 9 weeks, 2 days pregnant with my first, and couldn't be more thrilled.  I do have a serious question:  my home caught fire over the weekend, and I wanted to see if anyone knew about potential smoke inhalation effects on a fetus....I've searched and searched, and found one article about it, but I'm not satisfied with the amount of information given.  I was asleep when the fire started, and the smell woke me up before it got too horrible, thank God!  I am worried, but because I didn't cough, or have any symptoms of smoke inhalation, not worried enough to run to the doc just yet.  Any information would be much appreciated!  
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13167 tn?1327194124
My office building burned down,  and we all had to work days to clean it up and move the salvageable stuff,  etc.,  except one co worker who was pregnant.  Her doctor told her not to go back in the burnt building because she would be breathing toxic air.

I don't think in your case, if you got out of there quickly,  there is any harm done.  Does it still smell smoky?
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Avatar universal
Thanks so much...it does smell terribly smoky, but I haven't gone back in since it happened.  (My poor husband did all the moving so I wouldn't have to go back inside!)  Thanks again for your advice!
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